Men's Hockey at 2022 Winter Olympics: TV schedule, live stream, start time for tonight's Gold medal game – OlympicTalk – Home of the Olympic Channel

The official dates for the 2022 Winter Olympics are Friday, February 4 through Sunday, February 20, in Beijing, China. Men’s hockey begins this Wednesday, February 9 through Saturday, February 19 with the gold medal game taking place at 11 p.m. ET on USA network. See below for the full 2022 Winter Olympics Men’s Hockey TV schedule.
WATCH LIVE: Click here to sign up for Peacock and watch live Hockey at the 2022 Winter Olympics!
The U.S. men’s hockey team was eliminated from the tournament after falling to Slovakia in a 3-2 shootout on Tuesday night. The U.S. team entered the quarterfinals as the top seed while Slovakia was seeded eighth. See the schedule below to find out the matchups for the semi-finals and medal games. The gold medal game  at the 2022 Winter Olympics will be played on Saturday night at 11:10 p.m. ET between Finland and the ROC. The game can be watched live on USA Network and Peacock.
RELATED: 2022 Winter Olympics – TV schedule, day-by-day viewing guide to the Beijing Winter Games
Hockey will take place at two venues in Beijing: National Indoor Stadium and the Wukesong Sports Centre. National Indoor Stadium previously hosted rhythmic gymnastics, trampoline, and handball at the 2008 Summer Olympics. The venue is nicknamed “The Fan” because of its design that resembles a traditional Chinese folding fan. The Wukesong Sports Centre currently serves as the home arena for HC Kunlun Red Star of the KHL in addition to Beijing’s basketball and arena football teams. The venue was also the home for basketball at the 2008 Games.
NHL players were originally set to return to the lineup in Beijing after missing the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics–their first Olympic absence since 1994–but the league made the decision to withdraw in late December 2021 due to a surge in COVID-19 cases that impacted the NHL’s schedule.
RELATED: How to watch/stream the 2022 Winter Olympics on NBC and Peacock
Although some NHL players have expressed frustration they won’t get to compete in Beijing, this gives some of the league’s top prospects a chance to shine. Two Americans, Jake Sanderson (Whitefish, Montana) and Matty Beniers (Hingham, Massachusetts), are among those names. Sanderson was selected fifth overall by the Ottawa Senators in the 2020 NHL Draft. Beniers, currently a sophomore at the University of Michigan, was the second overall pick in the 2021 NHL Draft by the Seattle Kraken making him the first draft selection in the franchise’s history. Canadian’s Owen Power and Mason McTavish were two of the top-three picks from the 2021 NHL Draft. Power was selected first overall by the Buffalo Sabres and McTavish went third overall to the Anaheim Ducks.
The Russian Olympic Committee is the gold medal favorite in Beijing. Their 25-man roster is made up entirely of professional players from Russia’s KHL which is considered the second-best league in the world behind the NHL. Seven players from the 2018 Olympic championship team (when Russia competed as Olympic Athletes from Russia) will return to the lineup in Beijing.
RELATED: 2022 Winter Olympics – How to watch men’s, women’s U.S. Hockey on NBC and Peacock
The 2022 U.S. Men’s Olympic hockey team features the youngest roster since the 1994 Lillehammer Games. 19-year-old Matty Beniers is the youngest on the team. Forward Brian O’Neill is the only veteran from the 2018 Olympic team. Additionally, 15 of the 25 Americans currently play in the NCAA. A total of 14 NCAA schools are represented see the full list below.
Goalies: Drew Commesso, Strauss Mann, Pat Nagle
Defensemen: Brian Cooper, Brock Faber, Drew Helleson, Steven Kampfer, Aaron Ness, Nick Perbix, Jake Sanderson, David Warsofsky
Forwards: Nick Abruzzese, Kenny Agostino, Matty Beniers, Brendan Brisson, Noah Cates, Sean Farrell, Sam Hentges, Matthew Knies, Marc McLaughlin, Ben Meyers, Andy Miele, Brian O’Neill, Nick Shore, Nathan Smith
The group will be led by head coach David Quinn (Cranston, Rhode Island). Quinn most recently served as the New York Rangers head coach for three seasons (2018-2021). Prior to that, Quinn was the head coach at Boston University from 2013-2018.
RELATED: 2022 Winter Olympics – Stars to watch at the Beijing Winter Games
(Times are subject to change)
All Olympics Hockey games for The 2022 Winter Olympics are available on Peacock.
RELATED: Everything you need to know about the 2022 Winter Olympics
Peacock will be the streaming home of the Beijing Winter Games offering live stream coverage of every single event–that’s over 2,800 hours of Olympic action. In addition, to live stream coverage of every event, viewers will also be able to enjoy the Opening and Closing Ceremonies, NBC’s nightly primetime show, full replays of all competition available immediately upon conclusion, exclusive daily studio programming, medal ceremonies, extensive highlight clips, and more. Click here to sign up.
For the second consecutive Winter Games and third overall, NBC will broadcast its primetime Olympic show live across all time zones.
RELATED: 2022 Winter Olympics: Sports at the Beijing Winter Games
Be sure to follow OlympicTalk and NBC Olympics for the latest news and updates about the Beijing Winter Games!
 
The Closing Ceremony of the 2022 Winter Olympics takes place on Sunday, February 20 live at 7:00 a.m. ET on Peacock and NBCOlympics.com and again in primetime at 8:00 p.m. ET on NBC and Peacock.
The most memorable of Mikaela Shiffrin‘s 76 World Cup wins heading into the Killington Cup in Vermont on Saturday and Sunday (12:30 p.m. ET each day on NBC and Peacock) …

Dec. 20, 2012: Win No. 1


Under the lights in Åre, Sweden, a 17-year-old Shiffrin became the second-youngest American to win a World Cup (Jody Nagel, 1969). The look on her face was priceless. “I guess I just tried to fly,” she said moments after the victory. “I’m probably going to hug my mom a lot.”
“I don’t really like the success,” she added later, according to The Associated Press. “I like to sleep at night, and I like to hang around the hotel room with my mom. I’m afraid there might be a little hype with this. But I’ll take it. This is what I love to do.”

Shiffrin, a Coloradan, enjoyed some home cooking in Aspen by winning a slalom by a whopping 3.07 seconds combining times from two runs. It was the greatest margin of victory in World Cup women’s slalom history and larger than the margin that separated second place from 18th place.
“I don’t think [my competitors] are going to let me get away with three seconds ever again,” she said that day. She was right. Shiffrin won by a mere 2.65 seconds the next day (fourth-largest margin in history).

Shiffrin was recently asked her favorite of her five slalom wins (in five starts) in Killington. She said it was her first on the very first World Cup weekend at the venue. Not so much because of how she performed — prevailing by .73 of a second for a record-tying 10th consecutive World Cup slalom win. But for the moment she shared afterward — a finish area photo with dozens of members of team Shiffrin, including her 95-year-old grandmother. “The most proud I’ve ever been is to win a race in front of my nana,” she said then.
“Sometimes I wonder when I’m racing, is the pressure that I feel right now, and almost the sickness that I feel from this pressure, is it worth it?” she said recently. “Sometimes it only takes a single moment to make you realize how much it is worth it. And that was the moment for me.”

The exact peak of Shiffrin’s career? On this day, she finished off arguably the greatest season in history (a record 17 World Cup victories), capped by earning her first giant slalom season title at the World Cup Finals.
“The work is so worth it when you’re able to say that I’m really living my dream that I had when I was 5 years old,” she said at those World Cup Finals. “I was thinking, maybe it’s impossible, and then you realize that it is possible and that now you’re starting to push the limits of what everybody in the world thinks is possible. That’s a really cool feeling, but the feeling doesn’t change. I’m still just a girl with a dream.”
Shiffrin’s first victory since the death of her father, Jeff, the previous Feb. 2. She won a giant slalom in Courchevel, France, and, after a subdued reaction and dropping to her knees, called it bittersweet. “After everything, it’s hard to believe that I could get back to this point,” she said in one of several emotional post-race interviews. “I’m really excited, but it’s also pretty sad because … I guess that’s obvious.”
Later on social media, Shiffrin posted, “Cheers to the wonderful and kind people who said I lost my fire forever. This one’s for you. Also this one’s for every single person who is helping me get the fire back.”
Shiffrin burst into tears upon winning a night slalom in Schladming, Austria, an iconic venue for the men that hosted a women’s slalom for just the second time. It was also the venue of Shiffrin’s first world title in 2013. But the setting wasn’t wholly the reason for Shiffrin breaking down. She had been struggling — relatively, for her — in her trademark discipline while rival Petra Vlhova of Slovakia looked stronger and stronger. Shiffrin rallied from fifth place after the first run to win, edging Vlhova, the first-run leader.
“It feels like it didn’t happen,” said Shiffrin, who with the win broke the record for most World Cup victories in a single discipline (her 47th slalom). “Aside from Killington, for obvious reasons, it’s going to be my most memorable race, maybe of my career.”
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NBC Sports and Peacock combine to air live coverage of the 2022-23 Alpine skiing season, including races on the World Cup, which starts this weekend.
Coverage begins with the traditional season-opening giant slaloms in Soelden, Austria, this Saturday and Sunday, streaming live on Peacock.
The first of four stops in the U.S. — the most in 26 years — is Thanksgiving weekend with a women’s giant slalom and slalom in Killington, Vermont. The men’s tour visits Beaver Creek, Colorado the following week, as well as Palisades Tahoe, California, and Aspen, Colorado after worlds in Courchevel and Meribel, France.
NBC Sports platforms will broadcast all four U.S. stops in the Alpine World Cup season, plus four more World Cups in other ski and snowboard disciplines. All Alpine World Cups in Austria will stream live on Peacock.
Mikaela Shiffrin, who last year won her fourth World Cup overall title, is the headliner. Shiffrin, who has 74 career World Cup race victories, will try to close the gap on the only Alpine skiers with more: Lindsey Vonn (82) and Ingemar Stenmark (86). Shiffrin won an average of five times per season the last three years and is hopeful of racing more often this season.
On the men’s side, 25-year-old Swiss Marco Odermatt returns after becoming the youngest man to win the overall, the biggest annual prize in ski racing, since Marcel Hirscher won the second of his record eight in a row in 2013.
2022-23 Alpine Skiing World Cup Broadcast Schedule
Schedule will be added to as the season progresses. All NBC Sports TV coverage also streams live on NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app.
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